Wednesday, March 13, 2013

Celebrate Pi Day Thursday 3/14

Get it? 3/14?

Okay maybe you are not a geek or your mind is more on dessert than mathematics, but I am referring to the very special and may I dare say fun, irrational, infinite number that has fascinated mathematicians for centuries. That number is called Pi.

The subject of poetry, creative baked goods and even the star on t-shirts, our Pi is a popular guy! He even gets his own holiday! Pi Day Activities

According to the Pi Day website (, Pi is:

(The Greek letter “π”) ...the symbol used in mathematics to represent a constant — the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter — which is approximately 3.14159.

The history of Pi is very interesting. According to

...Mathematicians in the Babylonian Empire, about 2000 BC, had already figured out that pi was about 25/8, or 3.125. By about 1700 BC, in the Middle Kingdom, Egyptian mathematicians calculated pi to be about 3.16. People have been gradually getting closer ever since, with early contributions from mathematicians working in China, India, and the Islamic Empire. By 263 AD, the Chinese mathematician Liu Hui had calculated that pi was 3.141.

Want to liven up your Pi school day with some fun Pi-related activities? Check out some of these ideas below:

Would you like to see an animation of a circle unrolling Pi? Go to:

Here is a link to various math worksheets and activities incorporating the concept of Pi for upper elementary and middle school:

Fun fact: Did you know that M&M's come in a 3.14 oz. bag according to Mrs. Burke's page of fun-filled Pi day activities here: Pi Day Activities

Follow this link to a Pi poster PDF to download:

Have fun celebrating Pi Day!
Bonus question: What famous scientist shares his birthdate with the first three numbers of Pi?

That's right! Albert Einstein was born on 3/14/1879!


Sir Isaac Newton

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